Spring ( March, April, May) generally wet with sleet, rain and mist, allows us to get on with the task of bending the fruit bearing growth either in an arc or flat. This technique inhibits the tendency to upward growth and at the same time ensures an equal spread of leaf growth and the actual load of grapes.
  At the end of May, if the spring frosts are not too hard, we carry out the brief but wearying task of cutting out all the suckers from the base of the vinestock (émondage). Weather permitting, we start on the vines which were ploughed oves in winter. At the same time we begin the first treatments (sulphating) This is done whilst bearing in mind the risk of certain diseases oidium, mildew, among others linked to weather conditions, and referring to the warnings issued by the Plant Protection Agency.
  Weather permitting, we start on the vines which were ploughed oves in winter.
  At the same time we begin the first treatments (sulphating) This is done whilst bearing in mind the risk of certain diseases oidium, mildew, among others linked to weather conditions, and referring to the warnings issued by the Plant Protection Agency. (Lutte raisonnée).
    It is the beginning of summer. We have to hurry to prune the runners for the vines bent in an arc. Then we fix the vines in place by raising the double wires, thus lifting the plants into readily recognisable rows throughout their period of growth.
  Since vines belong to the liana family they do not stop growing as long as climatic conditions remain favourable ( alternate rain and sun).
 
  In order to check this growth we practice leaf pruning (rognage) which consists in taking off thé upper and lateral growth . This allows the fruit tendril to be well aired ; at thé saine time the vines are treated only if necessary.
  This is a decisive period for the vines and the eventual harvest. Vines are sensitive to disease and the sooner they are raised and aerated the less chance there is of disease affecting them.
  In addition we try to ensure a natural cover between the rows of vines to prevent soil erosion. However, on certain slopes, the vines are hard pressed to compete with grass; we have to find a compromise between healthy vines and the amount of grass we allow to grow.
  Winegrowers exercise a regulating role faced with an environment which is often exuberant!
    Lets us assume that Nature has been generous and the harvest looks like being abundant. If this is the case, and to avoid excess fruit which would reduce the overall quality, we have to prune off the excess grapes (end of July) ; this is one of thé requirements of thé AOC (Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée) which limits yields. This is referred to as the " green harvest" and must be carried out in a very short time. Its object is to concentrate all the essential elements in the remaining fruit.  
  With summer past, we have to think about the actual harvest the culmination of all our efforts.
  On the estate this essential operation is carried out by hand. This allows us to select the best grapes and reject those which are unsuitable. It is obvious that sound, ripe grapes, rather than damaged fruit, will give good wine.
  But each year is different and it is possible that Nature's whims interfere with the smooth climax to our year of hard labour. This is why being a winegrower is not something to take on lightly. You have to be passionate about vines and the craft if you wish to make a name for yourself.
  The must the juice of the pressed grapes is matured in our cellars. All solid malter is removed by racking and then it is allowed to develop on the fine lees for several months to produce a wine worthy of its Burgundian origins.
  In mid November, once the leaves have fallen from the vines, work begins again on pruning which is carried out during the dormant stage. This procedure has a direct influence on future yields since we can gauge the optimum length on the basis of the number of buds the fruit bearing growth already has.
    This description of the various tasks carried out at the Clos Gandin shows the extent to which we work using traditional methods and just how essential man's role is in the various stages of wine production.
  Today the AOC, with its strict demands is a guarantee of quality and origin designed to assist and guide the consumer in his choice. France is the only country in the world which insists on this system which ensures both the quality and origin of our product.
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